Top Rated Product

Product Reviews

Bean, Italian Rose

HEIRLOOM. Beauty and the bean—color and taste in abundance. Long an Italian favorite, Italian Rose will make an excellent addition to your summer soups or risotto. The intensely marked pods, marbled mahogany red on tan seeds, are packed with delicious flavor. Early and high-yielding plants.
Average Customer Rating:
4.75 out of 5
4.8
 out of 
5
5 out of 5(100%)reviewers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Reviews for Bean, Italian Rose
Review 1 for Bean, Italian Rose
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Submitted By:chihuahuaman12
From:Wall Township, NJ, USA
Region:Northeast
Reviewed On:August 14, 2013
Submitted By:chihuahuaman12
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Easy, Colorful, Productive Bush Beans!
Reviewed On:August 14, 2013
"These have the title of being my first bean crop ever! After selecting amongst the bush beans (I truly do not wish to buy tall poles and stick them in middle of my yard) I chose the Italian Rose Bush Beans because of the unique color combination! The color contrast between red and white truly receives eye appeal! The beans inside are even the same color and pattern as the glorious pods! Most of the beans are equally red and white colored. I got one bean pod that was all red on both sides! The scientific name of this variety of bean is Phaseolus vulgaris. Italian Rose beans ironically originate from Mexico but are popular in Italy. All beans and many other "vegetables" are actually fruits. A fruit comes from a flower. Some "vegetable" labeled misconceptions include beans, peas, cucumbers, tomatoes, zucchinis, squash, and even corn. The actual plant has both light and dark green leaves and nice pink/white flowers. Out of these flowers come the red and white beans. That proves that beans are fruits. At first the beans are light green and red streaked. After one or two weeks, the green becomes white and the red thickens in color. The advantages of bush beans is that the plants grow only a little over a foot tall, only half a foot wide, needs no poles or trellises, and provides great amounts of long ten-inch beans all of its growing season. Sow two beans seeds in the same spot for every spot in your rows. This will ensure that at least one bean plant will emerge. Usually both will come up and help each other. Sow these seeds after last frost dates because this is a warm season crop. Warm- season crops thrive in regions of long sun and can tolerate short periods of no water. This includes corn, squash, peppers, and some other vegetables and fruits. Cool-season crops thrive in cooler regions and grow in light shade. This includes arugula, potatoes, broccoli, and other vegetables and fruits. Sow bean seeds six inches apart, two inches deep, and in rows eighteen to thirty inches apart. Bean sprouts will emerge in about a week with adequate soil, water, and sun. Care for the bean plants is very little. Beans will grow up to ten inches. In about seventy-five days the beans will be ready to harvest. Harvest them when they are white and red. Wash the beans before cooking. Like many red or purple vegetable or fruits, the color wears off when cooked. This happens to the Italian Rose Beans too. When cooked, water used to cook the beans will be dyed translucent pink. The beans and pods will turn soft and green/yellow. I suggest boiling the pods with the beans in them and season with salt and pepper. The pods have chewy strings and are best enjoyed if the strings are removed. If you loved these beans so much that you need more next year, you can get seeds from your bean plants. If you wish to have some seeds for next year, let some of the mature pods on the plant ripen even further. The pods will begin to dry up and the red streaks will start to become a dark purple color. The white sections of the pods may turn beige. When purple-streaked, the beans inside are still fresh and red and white colored. They can be cooked then but will soon dry up. Let the pods on the bean plants turn completely or mostly beige. Then pick the dried pods; do not wait to much longer or else the pods will rot and hurt the plant. If you are not sure if the beans are seeds or for cooking, there is a simple test to tell the difference. Drop each of the "unsure" labeled beans onto a hard, flat surface, such as a kitchen surface, from about four inches high. If the bean makes a "crackle" sound, it is a seed. If it makes more of a "dense" sound, it can be cooked. The different sounds show how much water is in the beans. Seeds have less water. To save these seeds for next year, store them in an airy, dry place at cool temperatures. Too much humidity can cause the seeds to sprout too early or rot. Here is a recipe for a tasty dish that can be made with the Italian Rose beans. You need about three-fourths cup of the italian rose beans, one-fourth cup of cherry tomatoes, one-eighth cup of genovese basil leaves, and salt and pepper. Cook the beans with the pods in boiling water until the pods turn green and soft. The beans inside should be a faint purple/lavender. Mash the beans until they are like humus. Slice the cherry tomatoes lengthwise and place into the mashed beans. Cut the basil into very fine pieces and sprinkle onto the bean paste. Use a spoon to mix all of that together and then season with salt and pepper. One successful experiment I did the leftover bean pods was called "Bean Nachos." I put the bean pods in a bowl and grated a lot of cheddar cheese into the bowl onto the bean pods. Make sure to remove the chewy strings on the beans. Put both the bean pods and the cheddar cheese into the microwave oven and cook that until the cheese melts. It turned out a lot better than I thought it would! Watch out for the hot cheese though. Eat the cheesy bean pods like snacks. There are obviously many great recipes for the beans and many people will be astonished by the wild color of the beans. Many people probably have grown this plant for many years because of the unique colors. It is an heirloom bean variety, meaning it is a very old bean variety passed down and grown by generation to generation. Italian Rose Beans have made their way from Mexico to all places of the world and are particularly enjoyed in Italy in pastas and other Italian dishes. I would highly recommend this unique variety of bush bean for its ease of growth and productivity. Italian Rose beans require no stakes or trellises and take up little space. I planted my entire package of beans in two rows around ten feet long each. The rather small plant produced nice, disease-free, and colorful bean pods around ten inches long. The pods and beans tasted great and were definitely worth growing. I surely will grow these next year! Make sure to plant these amazing heirloom beans! Italian Rose Beans are certainly one of the best bean out there! You will enjoy them! Good Luck! Happy Planting!"
1 of 2 found this review helpful.
Review 2 for Bean, Italian Rose
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Submitted By:Melbournegarden
From:melbourne,FL
Region:Southeast
Reviewed On:May 8, 2012
Submitted By:Melbournegarden
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I love these beans!
Reviewed On:May 8, 2012
"These are the most dependable beans I have grown. They are beautiful to watch and very productive. I wished I planted more...but there is always next season :)"
Review 3 for Bean, Italian Rose
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Submitted By:DreamingOfAutumn
From:South Chicago Suburbs
Reviewed On:August 10, 2011
Submitted By:DreamingOfAutumn
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Heavy Yield, Great Taste
Reviewed On:August 10, 2011
"These beans are as delicious as they are beautiful. They mature fairly quickly, allowing me to plant several times throughout the season. The beans are a great addition to any soup or pasta dish. They are also great simmered in a little broth and sprinkled with Romano cheese. Simple and tasty. Also these are a great way to get your kids involved in the kitchen. My 2 and 4 year old loved helping me shell the beans."
Review 4 for Bean, Italian Rose
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Submitted By:hungarianharvester
From:Southern New Jersey
Reviewed On:February 28, 2009
Submitted By:hungarianharvester
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Great for soup and chilli...
Reviewed On:February 28, 2009
"I grew these two years ago and had great results. As I harvested my many "crops" last year, I missed having these beans. I dried them the pevious year and enjoyed them in many different meals. The only drawback is the I didn't have enough. This I will order the bigger size to get more of a harvest....."
2 of 2 found this review helpful.
Review 5 for Bean, Italian Rose
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Submitted By:Lionking
From:Queens, NY
Reviewed On:July 31, 2008
Submitted By:Lionking
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Rose Bush Beans
Reviewed On:July 31, 2008
"The neat little bushes were the best part of growing this variety as space is limited in my garden. Yet they still produced good-sized pods and my neighbors were all a-buzz about the color. When I cooked them they yielded a delicate flavor reminiscent of sweet lima beans. They had a very nice texture, but could be easily over seasoned."
1 of 1 found this review helpful.
Review 6 for Bean, Italian Rose
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Submitted By:Granny
Reviewed On:August 16, 2007
Submitted By:Granny
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Fantastic Flavor and Yield
Reviewed On:August 16, 2007
"Our family has searched for many years for a variety of heirloom green bean that our grandparents raised. We believe we have found it! This bean was easy to germinate, despite the dry cold spring Indiana had this year. The plant is a bush variety, with many of the blooms deep inside the plant instead of only at the top of the plant like many. We found this to be a plus, since we also are battling deer who graze our garden. The flowers and subsequent 6-8" pods were protected from the feeding deer by the fact that they grow deep inside the plant. Our family prefers "shellies" or the pods once they have mature beans inside. These beans have the most wonderful "meaty" taste and we were delighted to find that even the mature pods were tender and not "stringy" as many beans tend to become. My plants are still producing, although I have subsequent plantings of other varieties that have already come to the end of their productive cycle. I cannot praise this variety enough and my family believes this is the bean we have been seeking for over 15 years! Thanks, Burpee!"
5 of 5 found this review helpful.
Review 7 for Bean, Italian Rose
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Plant performance: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Taste: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Yield: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Submitted By:tturner
From:Jackson, TN
Reviewed On:August 2, 2006
Submitted By:tturner
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Plant performance: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Taste: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Yield: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Great taste
Reviewed On:August 2, 2006
"These beans produce very well and have wonderful flavor."
Review 8 for Bean, Italian Rose
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Plant performance: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Taste: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Yield: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Submitted By:Anonymous
Reviewed On:June 22, 2006
Submitted By:Anonymous
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Plant performance: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Taste: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Yield: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Reviewed On:June 22, 2006
This customer did not provide a text review.
2 of 3 found this review helpful.